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Acre Hall Primary School

Primary Academy     343 capacity

We aim to provide quality experiences in all aspects of school life, enabling the children to be happy, successful and keen to learn and helping them to grow into people who are fulfilled and equipped to make a positive contribution to society.

Across our learning community we create a happy and caring environment where all our children are valued and encouraged to do their best.

We support children to become independent learner through a range of creative and cross-disciplinary activities.

Our new school building was opened in 2015, and we’re fortunate enough to have new classrooms for our pupils to learn in.

Our committed staff, governors and volunteers all work together to provide the best they can for our children and their families.

The Ofsted report for our school can be found here.

Local Offer

At Acre Hall we are very proud of our Small Specialist Classes where we provide 30 places for pupils from across the authority who require specialist teaching to access the curriculum. Our expertise in this area is well documented and we run courses, in conjunction with The Teaching School at Elmridge, for different aspects of SEN.

Small Specialist Classes (SSCs) at Acre Hall

Acre Hall Primary School provides specialist support for 30 pupils with Education Health Care Plans (EHCPs). The designation for our 3 Small Specialist Classes (SSCs) is

Social communication and complex learning difficulties including Autistic Spectrum Disorders.

Our pupils come from all around the Borough eg Flixton, Timperley, Stretford and Old Trafford.

 Our children learn through multi- sensory experiences and benefit from a reduced and appropriately focused curriculum.

We cover similar topics and work to the mainstream classes but at a more appropriate pace and level.

 We have consistently received Good recognition from Ofsted.

September 2012 Ofsted - ‘Pupils with complex educational needs are taught consistently well and also make good progress. Teaching in the specialist classes for pupils with complex learning difficulties is highly effective in meeting their individual needs.’

January 2015 Ofsted - ‘Disabled pupils and those with special educational needs in the specialist small classes are mostly working at levels below those typical for pupils of their age, but make good progress, often from low starting points. Their specific learning needs are carefully identified and skilfully planned activities designed to meet their needs are highly effective in helping them to make good progress.’

December 2018 Ofsted – ‘Pupils attending the resourced provision with special educational needs and/or disabilities (SEND) make good progress in a wide range of subjects. Leaders work alongside several partner agencies and ensure that pupils receive the support they need.’

At Acre Hall, we also strive to address the social, emotional and communication needs of the children as well as confidence, concentration and attention skills. We work closely with parents and with other professionals who may be involved with supporting our children eg the Speech and Language Therapist, Local Authority advisors, School Nurse and the Educational Psychologist.

 Below is a brief summary of our Small Specialist Classes.

 Early Years and Key Stage 1

  • 4-7 year olds from Reception, Y1 and Y2.
  • 10 children and 2 adults - Teacher and Teaching Assistant.
  • A vibrant and interesting classroom offering many opportunities for different learning styles.
  • Outdoor learning areas.
  • Inclusion opportunities with other pupils in school

Key Stage 2 Small Specialist Classes

  • 7-11 year olds from Y3 to Y6.
  • 2 Small Specialist Classes for KS2
  • 10 children and 2 adults in each of these classes - Teacher and Specialist Teaching Assistant.
  • Interesting, well-resourced classrooms to support independent and small group learning for all children.
  • Trips to local facilities, museums and sporting events to promote independence and to involve the children in the wider community.

You can also read our School's SEN Information Report to find out more about the support we offer to children across the school with Special Educational Needs (SEN) or who are disabled.

 

Grading

Ofsted / CQC Grading
Good

Who to contact

Telephone
0161 748 4356 (Admin)
E-mail
acrehallprim.admin@trafford.gov.uk
Website
Acre Hall Primary

Where to go

Venue Address
Irlam Road
Flixton
Manchester
LANCASHIRE
Postcode
M41 6NA

Who is it for?

Ages
Mainstream school - 3 - 11 years old The Small Specialist Classes 4-11years old
Supporting People With
Learning disability
Mental health
Autistic Spectrum
Communication
Physical impairment
Hearing impairment
Visual impairment
Eligibility Details

To access our mainstream school, please follow Local Authority admissions Guidance.  

To attend a Small Specialist Class, a pupil is placed here by the Local Authority SEND office who follow the SEND procedures in Trafford.

How to use this service

Referral Required?
Referral Details

To apply for a place at this school, please see School Admissions

Cost Information
There are no costs to our service.

How accessible is this service?

Facilities
Accessible Toilet
Disabled Parking
Further Details

Accessibility Policy

The Dunham Trust believes it makes a significant contribution in transforming children's life chances. Our aim and commitment is to transform schools into sustainable learning academy communities.

"We aim to ensure that, for everyone involved, excellence and equity become and remain a reality"

"They come this way only once so we should litter their pathways with quality experiences"

We believe that we are able to help our academies and their young people to aspire to and achieve success. To do this, we are committed to ensuring that every child and young person has a pathway to succeed that:

• gives the best possible start in life

• equips with creativity, spirit and confidence

• enables individuals to appreciate life and equip for further learning

• supports the child in becoming a responsible citizen

• ensures continued success in his/her future and contributes to the local community

Our aims for ‘Improvement’ are designed to ensure all academies are consistently benchmarked against key improvement priorities. This framework will ensure effective progress across the Trust, whilst at the same time, leaving space for autonomy at the school level. It will:

• focus efforts on what really matters, i.e. our vision, principles and commitment to the children, young people, families and communities that we serve.

• provide a flexible approach to improvement that meets the needs of each Academy. This will involve a commitment to immediate improvement in each individual context, professional development and a collaborative approach that engages with improvement projects designed to build capacity, an approach that is responsive, reflective and sustainable.

• focus on outcomes, understanding that these are not negotiable. We are committed to a no-excuses culture. In achieving these outcomes, all will focus on individual responsibility and collective accountability for success

The Trust has a responsibility to ensure the success of each academy by allowing every pupil to maximise his/her potential. As an academy sponsor there will be an expectation for joint working across individual academies. The Trust is committed to high quality academy improvement activity, networking and development and research. Equally, the promotion of sport, outdoor education and the creative arts will be important in the development of pupil self-esteem and building learning skills.

ACCESSIBILTY STATEMENT

1. Introduction

1.1. Our Accessibility Plan is based on a belief in equality and inclusiveness for all and confirms that everyone should have equal access to facilities and services regardless of disability, age, gender or race. The Dunham Trust and all member schools put accessibility for all at the heart of the planning and design process.

1.2. At Acre Hall Primary School, we are committed to providing a fully accessible environment which values and includes all pupils, staff, parents and visitors regardless of their educational, physical, sensory, social, emotional and cultural needs. Further, we are committed to challenging negative attitudes about disability and accessibility, and to developing a culture of awareness, tolerance and inclusion.

1.3. The school recognises that many of our pupils, visitors and staff, whether disabled or otherwise, have individual needs when using school facilities. We understand that for all pupils, the nature of their disabilities may mean that they experience specific difficulties related to accessing education, and the physical environment. As part of our ongoing commitment to the delivery of an inclusive educational service, we work hard to ensure that all our pupils receive a high a standard of education and are supported in reaching their full potential. Good communication and co-operation between the school, home and other professionals are essential. The key aims of this plan are to:

 Increase the extent to which disabled pupils can participate in the curriculum

 Ensure the physical environment of the school gives disabled pupil’s physical access to education and extracurricular activities.

 Improve the delivery of information to disabled children and young people; using formats which give better access to information.

 Provide continued education as normally as the condition allows.

 Reduce the risk of lowering self-confidence and educational achievement. Promote equal access to education for all

 Establish effective liaison.

 Ensure that prompt action takes place when any issues which affect accessibility are identified

2. Statutory

2.1. The Equality Act 2010 and Equality Duty 2011 placed responsibilities upon schools to remove discrimination against pupils with disability. It requires schools to make ‘reasonable adjustments’ to their policies, procedures and practices to accommodate pupils with disability more fully in school life. There is a duty on schools to state what action they have taken to improve access and to have an Accessibility Plan.

2.2. The reasonable adjustments duty is triggered only where there is a need to avoid ‘substantial disadvantage’. Substantial is defined as being anything more than minor or trivial. Whether or not a

disabled pupil is at a substantial disadvantage or not will depend on the individual situation.

2.3. These duties apply to disabled pupils, as defined in the Equality Act 2010. The Act says that a pupil has a disability if they have a physical or mental impairment which has a long term and substantial adverse effect on their ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities. Physical or mental impairment includes sensory impairments such as those affecting sight or hearing.

2.4. The definition can include a wide range of impairments, including hidden impairments such as dyslexia, autism, speech and language impairments, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), or people diagnosed with cancer, HIV infection or multiple sclerosis. An impairment does not of itself mean that a pupil is disabled. It is the effect on the person’s ability to carry out normal day-to-day activities that should be considered.

2.5. The test of whether an impairment affects normal day-to-day activity is whether it affects one or more of the following:

 Mobility

 Manual dexterity

 Physical Co-ordination

 Continence

 Ability to lift, carry or otherwise move everyday objects

 Speech, hearing or eyesight

 Memory or ability to concentrate, learn or understand

 Perception of risk of physical danger

2.6. A child’s ability to memorise, concentrate, learn, speak, move, make and maintain positive relationships is central to their education. An impairment that has a long-term and substantial effect on a child’s ability to do these things may amount to a disability.

2.7. Some disabled pupils also have special educational needs (SEN) and may be receiving support via school-based SEN provision or have a statement of SEN. Just because a disabled pupil has SEN or has a statement does not take away the duty to make reasonable adjustments for them. In practice, of course, many disabled pupils who also have a statement of SEN will receive all the support they need through the SEN framework and there will be nothing extra the school has to do. However, some disabled pupils will not have SEN, and some disabled pupils with SEN will still need reasonable adjustments to be made for them in addition to any support they receive through the SEN framework.

3. Role of the Governing Body

3.1. This Accessibility Plan sets out the proposals of the Governing Body of the school to increase access to education for disabled pupils in the three areas required under the Equality Act 2010. The three key duties are to:

Increase the extent to which disabled children and young people can engage in the school curriculum.

Improve the physical environment of the school to increase disabled pupils’ physical access to education and extra-curricular activities.

 Improve the delivery of information to disabled children and young people, using formats which give better access to information.

3.2. The responsibility for the Accessibility Plan lies with the Governing Body and Head of School

3.3. It is a requirement that the school’s Accessibility Plan is resourced, implemented, and reviewed and revised as necessary. Attached is a set of action plans showing how the school will address the priorities identified in the plan.

4.1. The Equality Act 2010 does not override health and safety legislation. If making a particular adjustment would increase the risks to the health and safety of any person (including the disabled pupil in question) then this is a relevant factor in deciding whether it is reasonable to make that adjustment. However, as with the approach to any question of health and safety and risk assessment, schools are not required to eliminate all risk. Suitable and sufficient risk assessments should be used to help determine where risks are likely to arise and what action can be taken to minimise those risks. Risk assessments should be specific to the individual pupil and the activities in question. Proportionate risk management relevant to the disability should be an ongoing process throughout a disabled pupil’s time at the school.

4.2. There might be instances when, although an adjustment could be made, it would not be reasonable to do so because it would endanger the health and safety either of the disabled pupil or of other people. There might be other instances where schools could make anticipatory reasonable adjustments in line with health and safety legislation, ensuring compliance with, and not infringing, that legislation.

4. Health and Safety

4.1. The Equality Act 2010 does not override health and safety legislation. If making a particular adjustment would increase the risks to the health and safety of any person (including the disabled pupil in question) then this is a relevant factor in deciding whether it is reasonable to make that adjustment. However, as with the approach to any question of health and safety and risk assessment, schools are not required to eliminate all risk. Suitable and sufficient risk assessments should be used to help determine where risks are likely to arise and what action can be taken to minimise those risks. Risk assessments should be specific to the individual pupil and the activities in question. Proportionate risk management relevant to the disability should be an ongoing process throughout a disabled pupil’s time at the school.

4.2. There might be instances when, although an adjustment could be made, it would not be reasonable to do so because it would endanger the health and safety either of the disabled pupil or of other people. There might be other instances where schools could make anticipatory reasonable adjustments in line with health and safety legislation, ensuring compliance with, and not infringing, that legislation.

5. Charging Arrangements for Making Reasonable Adjustments

5.1. It is unlawful for a setting or school to charge a child for making reasonable adjustments in any circumstances, whatever the financial cost to the school and however the setting or school is funded.

6. School Context

6.1 Acre Hall houses 3 specialist classes for pupils with a range of special needs. Each class has 10 places with a specialist teacher and specialist teaching assistant. School holds an SLA with the Local Authority to provide these places and allocates pupils to them. The pupils

come from across the region not just our catchment area. All pupils in the small classes either already have an EHC plan or are awaiting one. There is a mix of need within these classes. The designation for them is ‘social, communication and complex learning difficulties including autism’. Consequently, school has a higher than average percentage of SEN pupils – 20%. In addition to those pupils with SEN school has a number of pupils with specific medical needs; hearing impairment, diabetes, auto immune disorder, Crohn’s disease, hyper mobility, serious allergies and asthma.

7. Existing Good Practice in School

7.1. Access and participation to the curriculum

Visual prompts and resources including visual timetables are used to facilitate access for all pupils where these are seen to be helpful

 Disability awareness is promoted in the curriculum, through assemblies and specific events.

 Staff working with pupils with disabilities receive specialist training.

 Thorough risk assessments are undertaken as required and take full account of the needs of disabled children, for example a named adult will provide 1:1 support if appropriate.

 Care plans are produced where a medical need is identified

 Disabled pupils are able to access a range of activities and clubs beyond the school day; they participate in residential visits.

7.2 Access to the physical environment

Acre Hall Primary is a newly built( 2015/16) and complies with relevant building regulations for disabled persons.

 A lift transports those with mobility issues who can not climb stairs to the first floor – fire evacuation chairs are used in the event of an alarm activation

 All classrooms and corridors are accessible for wheelchairs and frames

 Corridors and routes are kept clear of obstacles.

7.3. The delivery of information

Pupils on roll receive support form specialist services e.g. Occupational Therapists, Speech Therapist, Educational Psychologist, Diabetes Nurse.

 Annual reviews completed by school SENCO and specialist teachers enable sharing of information

 Parents’ Evening and drop in sessions give the opportunity for parents to ask questions

 Weekly school newsletter advertises school events and clubs

 Text messaging system and Parent Mail allow quick and easy distribution of information

The accompanying action plan details how Acre Hall primary will build on current good practice to make further improvements to accessibility for all its pupils.

Monitoring and review

The implementation of this policy will be monitored by the Head of School, who will make an annual report to the Local Governing Body.

 

 

Last updated date:
01 November 2019

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